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R3-R864
Abstracts, Doctor-Patient Communication, End of Life and Death Issues, Ethics, Electronic Medical Records, Hospice Care
Alexandra Andrews


R3 - Medical (General)

R723 - Medical philosophy. ethics
End-of-Life and Death Issues

R726 - Hospice Care
R727 - Doctor - Patient Communication


R864 - Portable Medical Records


R3 - Medical (General)
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R31.C143.1 - Abstracts Cancer Supportive Care Program and Web Site
CancerSupportiveCare Team
Cancer Supportive Care programs represent an exciting vision of synthesis recognizing the patient as a whole person. Cancer treatments affect all parts of the body, spirit, and mind. The web site provides worldwide support.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/Abstracts/index.html
First appeared 2003-07-27; updated 2007-02-17
R31.M159.1 -Scientific Article Abstracts; Ephemeral Validity
M.J. McKeown, MD, FACOG, FACS
Definitions of what an abstract is...a written summary of the key points of a scientific paper...a statement summarizing the important points of a text and more
http://cancersupportivecare.com/abstract.html
First appeared 2006-10-22; updated 2006-11-01

R723 - End-of-Life and Death Issues
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R724.R39.1 - Life and Death Instructions - Planning for The End
Ernest H. Rosenbaum, MD; Isadora R Rosenbaum, MA; Debra Marks, PhD; Sabrina Selim, MD; Thomas Addison, MD; Joanna Beam, JD; Meryl Brod, PhD; David Claman, MD; Alan J. Coleman, MD; Malin Dollinger, MD; Michael Glover; Nancy Lambert, RN, BSN; Elmo Petterle; Patricia Sparacino, RN, MS, Jeffrey Silberman, Dmin; Kenneth A Woeber, MD
Death is a part of life. We all know that we must die sometime: we just don't know when. Despite this reality, we often think of death as something that happens to other people. Most of us have a difficult time accepting our own mortality
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/end.html
First appeared 1999-05-01; updated 2007-07-15
R724.R39.2 - Choosing Life: Living Your Life While Planning for Death
Ernest H. Rosenbaum, MD; Isadora R Rosenbaum, MA; Debra Marks, PhD; Sabrina Selim, MD; Thomas Addison, MD; Joanna Beam, JD; Meryl Brod, PhD; David Claman, MD; Alan J. Coleman, MD; Malin Dollinger, MD; Michael Glover; Alexandra Andrews, Nancy Lambert, RN, BSN; Elmo Petterle; Patricia Sparacino, RN, MS, Jeffrey Silberman, Dmin; Kenneth A Woeber, MD
Despite the inevitability of death and the importance of planning for tomorrow, the purpose of life is to live. The diagnosis of an acute or chronic illness doesn't need to be experienced as an automatic death sentence; it can be viewed as an important reminder to live each day as if it were the last.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/plan.html
First appeared 1999-05-01; updated 2010-11-07
R724.R39.3 - Compassionate End-of-Life Care - How to Approach and Prevent Suffering
Ernest H. Rosenbaum, MD
Each person wants to live as long as possible and with as much comfort and enjoyment as feasible. This becomes more significant when a person is gravely ill or enters into an end-of-life process.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/endcare.html
First appeared 2006-03-06; updated 2006-08-22
R724.R39.4 - A Good Goal - Quality of Life
Ernest H. Rosenbaum, MD
Try to make an assessment of your life. Take care of yourself with the aid of the medical team, the social team of nurses, medical social workers, hospice, family members and friends. It's important to keep hope as alive as possible, even under grave circumstances.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/goal.html
First appeared 2006-05-07;
R724.R39.5 - Choices - Death and Dying
Ernest H. Rosenbaum, MD
Death has always had a sacred place in life. Death becomes not only a moment in time but at the end of life it has a relationship with all around. Anger and forgiveness need to be addressed. Knowledge is important, helping in controlling physical and mental symptoms.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/death.html
First appeared 2007-03-27;
R724.R39.6 - A Search For Something Better For The Dying Process
Ernest H. Rosenbaum, MD and Isadora R. Rosenbaum, MA
Death is like an earthquake: you know it's coming, but you don't know where or when. It makes all equal in the end. It is a democratic process. You know you should prepare for it. Includes medical emergency card and information.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/endqol.html
First appeared 2007-03-29; updated 2007-11-20
R724.R39.7 - End of Life Dignity Care
Ernest H. Rosenbaum, MD
Medical care should promote dignity in end-of-life for a good death. Optimal supportive care to control symptoms such as pain and psychological distress and suffering with both medical and spiritual support, frees patients, families and caregivers during the dying process.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/dignity.html
First appeared 2007-07-23;
R724.R39.8 - Supportive Care For the End Of Life
Ernest H. Rosenbaum, MD
At the end of life, patients, families and doctors are dealing with the difficult problems concerning medical treatments. The use of Advanced Directives is a partial tool to help direct the most optimal medical care for best quality of life in the dying phase.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/endsupport.html
First appeared 2007-08-26;
R724.R39.9 - POLST - A Potential Better Way to Ensure End-of-Life Care through Improved Medical Orders
Ernest H. Rosenbaum, MD
Physician's Orders for Life-Sustaining Treatments (POLST), better conveys a dying patients wishes for all health care problems. This bright pink form signed by a physician, nurse or physician's assistant asks patients about preferences for CPR, antibiotics, artificially administered nutrition and general medical interventions. It is not designated for the healthy but for those with advanced, chronic illnesses, and it is actually a medical order.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/polst.html
First appeared 2007-09-18;
R724.R39.10 - Dealing With Death If Cancer Becomes Terminal
Ernest H. Rosenbaum, MD and Isadora R. Rosenbaum, MA
Death is never easy to accept. We do not accept our mortality until a crisis forces us to contemplate non being. Life is elusive and precious. It may be snuffed out in a moment or drain away slowly with disease or old age. There is concern over maintaining dignity in life and in dying. Saying goodbye before death can be a comfort to everyone concerned - family, friends, and patient.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/terminal.html
First appeared 2008-10-22;

R726 - Hospice Care
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R726.H45.1 - Hospice Care
Irene Harrison, LCSW
The hospice philosophy embraces a holistic approach that encompasses physical, emotional and spiritual concerns. Physicians, Nurses, Chaplains, Volunteers, Nutritionists, Pharmacists, Psychologists, Speech, Physical and Occupational Therapists together with the patient, friends and family create individualized lifestyle care.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/hospice.html
First appeared 1999-05-01; updated 2008-08-30

R727 - Doctor-Patient Communication
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R727.3.W90.1 - Talking To Your Medical Team
Robert Wascher, MD, FACS, Ernest Rosenbaum, MD, Alexandra Andrews, Charles M. Dollbaum, MD, PhD, Karen Ritchie, MD, Sarah Schorr, RN, BSN, Francine Manuel, RPT, Jean Chan, BA, MA, SEd, Richard Shapiro, MD
Cancer treatment side effects endure long after medical treatment ends. Fatigue, painful or uncomfortable symptoms are not always visible. Neuropathic changes are associated with surgery, chemotherapy, radiation therapy, bisphosphonate therapy and hormonal therapy. Peripheral neuropathy drugs include vincristine, viblastine, vinorelbine, cisplatin, paclitaxel, docitaxel, carboplatin, oxaliplatin, cisplatin, etoposide, tenoposide, thalidomide, bortezomib and interferon. Scar tissue that forms after surgery is not as elastic as healthy skin, and may entrap sensory nerve fibers (neuromas). Includes Suggestions for Discussing Symptoms With Your Medical Team and Suggestions For Alleviating Pain
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/talk.html
First appeared 2007-12-13; updated 2008-08-02

R864 - Portable Medical Records
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R864.D171.1 - A Personal Portable Health Record
J. Ben Davoren, MD, PhD
Encourage your providers of healthcare to give you copies of your information. The future of computer personal health information storage on the Internet is approaching, but starting your own electronic collection now can help you and your future healthcare providers plan the best care for you.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/Survivor/electronic.html
First appeared 2007-11-13; updated 2008-08-02
R864.D171.2 - A Personal Portable Health Record
J. Ben Davoren, MD, PhD
Encourage your providers of healthcare to give you copies of your information. The future of computer personal health information storage on the Internet is approaching, but starting your own electronic collection now can help you and your future healthcare providers plan the best care for you.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/Legacy/online.html
First appeared 2008-01-31;
R864.R39.1 - Medical Emergency Information - A Simple Card (Text version)
Ernest H. Rosenbaum, MD
A Medical Emergency Information Simple Card to carry in your wallet. Legacy of Love: End-of-Life Form
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/emergencycard.txt
First appeared 2007-11-20
R864.R39.2 - Medical Emergency Information - A Simple Card (PDF version)
Ernest H. Rosenbaum, MD
A Medical Emergency Information Simple Card to carry in your wallet. Legacy of Love: End-of-Life Form
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/emergencycard.pdf
First appeared 2007-11-20


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First appeared July 23, 2007, updated August 5, 2012