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RC262
Art, Caregiving, Diversions, Quality of Life, Supportive Care, Spirituality, Will to Live
Alexandra Andrews



RC262 Supportive Care Issues
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RC262.A178.1 - UCSF Ida and Joseph Friend Cancer Resource Center
Paul Asfour, Volunteer Program Manager and Patient Educator
Information, Emotional, and Lifestyle Support care is profoundly important. At the UCSF Ida and Joseph Friend Cancer Resource Center, we offer imagery and guided meditation, yoga, dance, restorative movement, Pilates-based exercise, support groups, a premiere peer-support program, free educational pamphlets, books and recordings, monthly topical seminars, medical preparation planning and regular nutrition classes. Collaborative programs include Smoking Cessation, Art for Recovery, Prepare for Surgery, and medical research services with professional medical librarians.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/Survivor/ucsfresource.html
First appeared 2007-12-12; updated 2008-08-02
RC262.A198.1 - Realize What Is Important
Darrel Ansbacher
The cure will be worth it - no gamble too great to get rid of a fatal disease. I do not deserve death yet I have paid the price. I have bought time. I deserve life.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/InnerFire/important.html
First appeared 2008-04-28; updated 2009-06-12
RC262.B35.1 - To Have Ever Lived at All!
Diane Behar
Life is a gift. It is a miracle...These powerful, positive words were the starting point of my will to live - And then you will be fine.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/InnerFire/lived.html
First appeared 2008-05-05; updated 2009-06-12
RC262.B35.2 - Cancer - Coping and Hope
Diane Behar, Isadora R. Rosenbaum, MA and Ernest H. Rosenbaum, MD
Attitudes and behaviors are used used to cope with stress, maintain emotional well-being and hope. Live day to day, focus thoughts in the present tense, deal with matters close at hand, learn to live with illness, finding hope.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/cope.html
First appeared 1999-05-01 updated; 2012-08-19
RC262.K13.2 - Spirituality and Chaplaincy
Andrew Kneier, PhD, Jeffrey Silberman, DMin, Andrew Freinkel, MD, Ernest H. Rosenbaum, MD, David Spiegel, MD
A life-threatening disease, such as cancer,
RC262.B165.1 - I Don't Have Time Not to Live
Carol Buck
There is a great connection between the mind and the body...I don't have time not to live. I live a very busy life, both in life and in enjoyment.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/InnerFire/time.html
First appeared 2007-07-05; updated 2009-06-10
RC262.B201.1 - A Cup of Breath
Ellie Bine
People need a tangible reason to continue to struggle. If they do not have one, they had better find one, even if it is the refusal to be victimized by their misfortune. I think anyone who sets their mind to it can do anything if they try hard enough.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/InnerFire/cup.html
First appeared 2008-05-01; updated 2009-06-12
RC262.C208.1 - In Touch with My Dream
Alan J. Cooper, MD
The Native American belief that when a man loses his dream, he begins to die. Illness for me has been a gift and a springboard into new life. I have been able to resurrect hope and fun and to rediscover the value of leisure and laughter.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/InnerFire/dream.html
First appeared 2008-05-08; updated 2009-06-2009


RC262.D224.1 - Reducing Stress in the Stressed-Out World of Cancer
Susan Diamond, LCSW, Ernest H. Rosenbaum, MD and David Spiegel, MD
Feel what you feel. Be an active participant in your living with cancer to maintain your emotional perspective. Don't force yourself to be upbeat about your disease. A prison of positive thinking may inhibit obtaining necessary medical information, treatment - lead family and friends to discourage sadness and fear - provide fertile ground for inappropriate guilt.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/stress.html
First appeared 2009-01-27; updated 2009-02-20
RC262.E160.1 - Expedition Inspiration
Laura Evans
I feel as if I have been given a special gift - the gift of life - and I don't want to squander it.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/InnerFire/expedition.html
First appeared 2006-11-25; updated 2009-06-10
RC262.F200.1 - I Live a Disease-Threatening Life
Rick Fields
If you go into a battle fearlessly accepting the possibility of death and almost embracing it, you have a much better chance of fighting well, and in fact of winning. The spiritual path of Medicine Buddha, Buddhist training and study teach the fear of our own death is like the fear of our own birth or the fear of our own life.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/InnerFire/buddhist.html
First appeared 2008-04-28; updated 2009-06-12


RC262.G141.1 - The Stanford Cancer Concierge Program
Holly Gautier, RN, Cancer Concierge Services, Stanford Comprehensive Cancer Center
The Cancer Concierge Services aspires to build a new model of care that addresses the needs of each individual and his or her support system, to assist each person through diagnosis, treatment program, recovery process, and survival. It is designed to integrate all aspects of healing: strengthening the body, educating the mind, and fostering hope and courage and complement the wide array of traditional cancer treatments.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/Survivor/concierge.html
First appeared 2007-12-12; updated 2008-08-02
RC262.G147.1 - To Call Forth That Spark
Kathleen Grant, MD
Hope is part of that empowerment that says, I have a right to wish for more life, more health, more time to accomplish a goal.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/InnerFire/spark.html
First appeared 2005-06-10; updated 2009-06-10
RC262.G203.1 - A Buddy and a Group
Jack D. Gordon, MD
There is the will to live when you are fighting for your life, and there are survival factors that cannot be measured, such as pure, dumb luck.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/InnerFire/buddy.html
First appeared 2008-05-02; updated 2009-06-12
RC262.I163.1 - Each Day Really Is a Miracle
Father Isaacs
The will to live, is awakened by looking through a new set of eyes at what you have been doing and getting a new perspective on your life.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/InnerFire/miracle.html
First appeared 2007-06-17; updated 2009-06-10


RC262.J207.1 - Recharging My Batteries
Joanna
This illness has had a liberating effect on me. It has forced me to reevaluate my priorities. I avoid negative people. I am learning to take care of myself. I am also training myself to enjoy each day thoroughly and be thankful for it.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/InnerFire/batteries.html
First appeared 2008-05-08; updated 2009-06-12
RC262.K13.1 - When Your Spouse Has Cancer
Andrew Kneier, PhD
Your spouse has cancer, Face cancer together, Discussion is better than assumption, Support emotional reactions and concerns and Confront sexual issues.The illness is really happening to both of you. You are sharing many of same emotions and concerns. Your life is being disrupted in many of the same ways.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/spouse.html
First appeared 2005-08-29 updated; 2012-08-19
RC262.K13.2 - Spirituality and Chaplaincy
Andrew Kneier, PhD, Jeffrey Silberman, DMin, Andrew Freinkel, MD, Ernest H. Rosenbaum, MD, David Spiegel, MD
A life-threatening disease, such as cancer, confronts us with realities and questions that prompts to step back from our lives and reflect on the meaning and implications of the illness.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/spirituality.html
First appeared 1999-05-01; updated 2007-11-08
RC262.K13.3 - Coping with Cancer: 10 Steps Towards Emotional Well-Being
Andrew Kneier, PhD, Isadora R. Rosenbaum, MA, and Ernest H. Rosenbaum, MD
10 coping strategies for patients to face cancer. Facing the Reality of Your Illness, Maintaining Hope and Optimism, Proportion and Balance, Expressing Your Emotions, Reaching Out for Support, Adopting a Participatory Stance, Finding a Positive Meaning, Spirituality, Faith and Prayer, Coming to Terms with Mortality
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/10steps.html
First appeared 1999-05-01 updated; 2008-09-09


RC262.M204.1 - Still in the Ball Game
Edward Madison
I have been afraid of being a living dead person not dying. What concerns me is the quality of life. The awakening of love, The audacity to dream, The will to live.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/InnerFire/ballgame.html
First appeared 2008-05-02; updated 2009-06-12
RC262.M234.1 - What If You Lived 337 Years?
Lotfi Mansouri, General Director San Francisco Opera
The wish to live longer contains the assumption that the health and energy of youth will also be extended. Billions of dollars are spent on vitamins, cosmetics, moisturizers, plastic surgery, exercise and diet regimens, hoping to slow down the aging process. Your lifetime can be filled with health, well-being, enjoyment, discovery, rewarding work, satisfaction of achievement, intellectual enlightenment, and spiritual strength.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/mansouri.html
First appeared 2009-12-22;
RC262.P25.1 - Diversions - Creativity And Coping
Cynthia Perlis, BA; Ernest H. Rosenbaum, MD; Isadora R. Rosenbaum, MA
Courage, hope, faith, sympathy, love promote health and prolong life. A contented mind, a cheerful spirit is health to the body and strength to the soul. How you live has a major effect on your health and your life
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/diversions.html
First appeared 1999-05-01; updated 2007-11-08
RC262.P25.2 - Art And Longevity
Cynthia Perlis, BA, Ernest H. Rosenbaum, MD and Douglas Wallace, PhD
Art is a healing force. Artistic expression is an important psychosocial activity to communicate and alleviate stress.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/art.html
First appeared 2009-12-08;


RC262.R39.1 - Inner Fire: Your Will to Live - Stories of Courage, Hope, and Determination
Ernest H. Rosenbaum, MD, and Isadora R. Rosenbaum, MA
The will to live is in both your heart and your mind. Common factors for the will to live - hope, faith, attitude, determination, the love of life, courage, luck and chance, the ability to cope, a support system, having a purpose, and appropriate medical care.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/InnerFire/index.html
First appeared 2006-11-25; updated 2009-06-12
RC262.R39.2 - Inner Fire: Your Will to Live Introduction
Ernest H. Rosenbaum, MD, Isadora R. Rosenbaum, MA, and David Spiegel, MD
Inner Fire factors include: hope, faith, attitude, determination, the love of life, courage, luck, chance, the ability to cope, a support system, having goals, and appropriate medical care
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/InnerFire/begin.html
First appeared 2006-11-25; updated 2009-06-10
RC262.R39.3 - Introduction To Climb A Mountain
Ernest H. Rosenbaum, MD, and Isadora R. Rosenbaum, MA
Expedition Inspiration to conquer Aconcagua in Argentina, the highest mountain outside the Himalayas inspired hope and courage in women with breast cancer...Count me in. I've got a lot more to live for and a lot more to give in this life.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/InnerFire/climb.html
First appeared 2006-11-25; updated 2009-06-10
RC262.R39.4 - Unfinished Business
Ernest H. Rosenbaum, MD and Isadora R. Rosenbaum, MA
We live because we want to live. But the incentive must one which we inwardly, utterly believe. It is not the everything to live for in the eyes of the world that keeps us alive, but the something which meets our own uncompromising measure of what is worth living for.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/InnerFire/intro2.html
First appeared 2007-03-21; updated 2009-06-10
RC262.R39.5 - Achieving Optimal Care for Cancer Patients
Ernest H. Rosenbaum, MD
Optimal coping mechanisms, and psychological and emotional support decrease feelings of anxiety and depression, provide encouragement. Supportive help for patient, family and friends can often make a difficult situation not only feasible but a very gratifying process through a joint sharing of responsibility between the patient, family, friends and medical team.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/optimal.html
First appeared 2007-09-18;
RC262.R39.6 - Caregivers
Ernest H. Rosenbaum, MD
Caregiving includes providing nutritional and emotional support, and assisting with exercise. By knowing how to talk to the ill person, caregivers promote confidence, courage and hope that is vital to help patients cope with their illness and with the process of getting well.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/Survivor/caregiver.html
First appeared 2007-12-06; updated 2008-08-02
RC262.R39.7 - Putting On The Boxing Gloves
Ernest H. Rosenbaum, MD and Isadora R. Rosenbaum, MA
We need courage. dignity, and optimism to meet our challenges in life with hope that we can overcome whatever obstacles are present.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/InnerFire/intro3.html
First appeared 2008-04-18; updated 2009-06-10
RC262.R39.8 - The Power Of Love: Family And Friends
Ernest H. Rosenbaum, MD and Isadora R. Rosenbaum, MA
Our health suffers if we lack social contact. because of their love for their friends and family that people persevere in the face of a grave illness or a life-threatening situation.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/InnerFire/intro4.html
First appeared 2008-05-01; updated 2009-06-12
RC262.R39.9 - A Positive Attitude
Ernest H. Rosenbaum, MD and Isadora R. Rosenbaum, MA
Hope is the most beautiful of affections energizing the prolongation of life. Medical researchers are now combining methods to create in the mind positive images about what is occurring in the body with traditional medicine. Attitude can make the difference.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/InnerFire/positive.html
First appeared 2008-05-04; updated 2009-06-12
RC262.R39.10 - The Will to Live
Ernest H. Rosenbaum, MD and Isadora R. Rosenbaum, MA
Hope is the most beautiful of affections energizing the prolongation of life. Medical researchers are now combining methods to create in the mind positive images about what is occurring in the body with traditional medicine. Attitude can make the difference.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/InnerFire/fire.html
First appeared 2008-05-08; updated 2009-06-12
RC262.R39.11 - The Philosophy of Caretaking for an Ill Person
Ernest H. Rosenbaum, MD
Caretakers give compassionate care, listen, help and create hope. Conversations encourage positive feelings, leaving a legacy of love, good memories, sharing of values and philosophy. Is it fair to consider palliative care or euthanasia. Feelings of sadness and helplessness ocur as patient, caregiver and the medical team struggle with progressive, terminal illness and enter the dying phase.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/caretake.html
First appeared 2008-09-13;
RC262.R39.12 - Caregivers - Sources of Strength
Ernest H. Rosenbaum, MD
Caregivers hope to comfort, control suffering, and pain, provide physical and emotional support for patient and family with medical and spiritual support. Includes - Goals of the Legacy Project, sources of strength, dignity therapy, services that enhance quality of life, and peace of mind.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/caregive.html
First appeared 2008-09-13; updated 2012-11-18
RC262.R39.13 - The Role of Music In Health
Ernest H. Rosenbaum, MD, Jim Murdock and Malin Dollinger, MD
Music offers immediate gratification. There are no contraindications to music. Music helps emotional recovery, relaxation, communication, coordination - using dancing and physical therapy rehabilitation. It reduces medical therapy anxiety and stress.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/music.html
First appeared 2009-09-13;
RC262.R39.14 - Humor and Health
Ernest H. Rosenbaum, MD, Malin Dollinger, MD and Stu Silverstein, MD
A contented mind, a cheerful spirit is health to the body and soul. A smile, humor and laughter have been found to reduce anger, fear, anxiety, depression, illness, pain, stress, increase energy, healing, relaxation, and happiness. Helping people cope and produce improved relations among family members and friends.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/humor.html
First appeared 2009-12-12;
RC262.R39.15 - Learn To Manage Stress
Ernest H. Rosenbaum, MD
Stress is something we cannot see, hear or touch. Ignoring stress can lead to bigger problems, even illness. Learn to manage your stress and to find ways to take better care of yourself.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/stressful.html
First appeared 2010-03-07;
RC262.R39.16 - To The Patient - Cope, Compromise And Hope
Ernest H. Rosenbaum, MD and Isadora R. Rosenbaum, MA
Cancer rehabilitation requires a total approach to the person - Set new realistic goals, Leave anger and bitterness behind, Free your energies, Live in the present, Include exercise, sleep, nutrition, sexuality and supportive care. To cope may require compromise -- to accept what cannot be changed. Hope is an essential part of the will to live.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/patient.html
First appeared 2010-04-26;
RC262.R39.17 - Family And Friends -- Cope, Compromise And Hope
Ernest H. Rosenbaum, MD and Isadora R. Rosenbaum, MA
Family and friends are the greatest allies and resources to the physician for patients with cancer. Continued love and compassion give hope and courage to the patient. Illness, incapacity and the threat of death are difficult subjects this inability to communicate can occur under conditions of stress.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/family.html
First appeared 2010-05-10;
RC262.R39.18 - Caregivers - Needs and Support
Ernest H. Rosenbaum, MD
The goal of a caregiver is to improve quality of life by reducing suffering and pain, through personal services. They provide hope, comfort, physical and emotional support for patient and family with medical and spiritual support. Caretaking can cause devastating emotional, physical, financial, stress, depression, fatigue, and mental problems.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/caregivers.html
First appeared 2008-09-13; updated 2012-11-18
RC262.R228.1 - Stress and Survival
Alan Rosenstein, MD
Stress has profound effects on the way we feel. Disease or disorder stressors may vary. Effects of chronic turmoil can produce wear and tear which will eventually have an impact on longevity of the body.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/stressor.html
First appeared 2009-11-24;


RC262.S28.1 - Courage and Hope
David Spiegel, MD
Respond creatively to a life-threatening illness hear it as a wake-up call, a reminder of how time is short and life is precious.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/courage.html
First appeared 1999-05-01; updated 2006-03-29
RC262.S51.1 - The Relationship Between Mind, Body and Soul
Rabbi Jeffery M. Silberman, DMin and Lisa Tremont, MPH, RD
Spirituality, faith and prayer improves mental health, happiness, quality of life, and longevity, reducing the risk for heart disease and cancer. Clinicians have long observed that patients with a strong personal faith recover better and live longer than those without such resources.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/soul.html
First appeared 2009-12-08; changed 2014-10-26

RC262.S51.2 - Faith
Rabbi Jeffery M. Silberman, DMin and Lisa Tremont, MPH, RD
Persons who enjoy a greater sense of coherence and order in their lives also have better physical and psychological health than those who do not. Religious faith is a cornerstone to a stable lifestyle, higher levels of life satisfaction, greater personal happiness, and fewer negative psychological consequences of traumatic life events.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/faith.html
First appeared 2014-10-26;

RC262.S51.3 - Prayer
Rabbi Jeffery M. Silberman, DMin and Lisa Tremont, MPH, RD
Prayer may be a step towards longevity in that it fosters faith. Prayer is not a technique for curing real and organic diseases, Though it contributes enormously to the enjoyment of abundant health and to the relief of numerous mental, emotional, and nervous ailments.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/prayer.html
First appeared 2014-10-26;

RC262.S164.1 - Arms Too Short to Box with God
Val Staton
The will to live is the desire to continue on... A person who has the comfort of faith and the ability to accept and continue on is much better off than somebody who is only materially wealthy.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/InnerFire/box.html
First appeared 2007-07-04; updated 2009-06-10
RC262.S196.1 - A Broken Window Every Day
Maria Smith, Ernest H. Rosenbaum, MD and Leef Smith
Go on with life with real strength, have confidence in those who care about you. I think one of the worst things is for people to go for treatment every week feeling they are in a cold, steel world. I had my husband and my doctor to comfort me.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/InnerFire/window.html
First appeared 2008-04-24; updated 2009-06-12
RC262.S199.1 - A Tough Old Bird
Ruth Smith
Hope is the companion of power and the mother of success. The will to live? It is knowing that you can do something for someone else. That keeps you going.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/InnerFire/bird.html
First appeared 2008-04-28; updated 2009-06-12
RC262.S206.1 - Live Life to the Fullest
Sam
Because of my physical disabilities, but I fight harder because I have someone I love. I want to live life to the fullest. There is life and there is death. If you come into this world and do nothing, You will die and no one will know you existed.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/InnerFire/fullest.html
First appeared 2008-05-08; updated 2009-06-12
RC262.T202.1 - One in a Million
Connie Teevan
I want to make my own destiny. My destiny is to live. This is just my life. I'm going to live. I'm going to make it.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/InnerFire/million.html
First appeared 2008-05-02; updated 2009-06-12
RC262.T205.1 - The Scent of an Orange
Jane Townsend
We can be joyful in life and cope with the challenges of disease at the same time. Openness is the acknowledgment that your future will be different than the one you had dreamed.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/InnerFire/orange.html
First appeared 2008-05-05; updated 2009-06-12
RC262.Y209.1 - An Inner Fire
Susan Yoachum
The will to live is a feeling of not being through yet. I have a very clear idea of the special quality of each day I have metastatic breast cancer an incurable illness. It can go into remission. I am forging an uneasy peace with this cancer that defies answers.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/InnerFire/inner.html
First appeared 2008-05-08; updated 2009-06-12



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