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RC266-270
Alcohol, Bed Rest, Bedsore Prevention, Chemoprevention, Self-Care, Environment, Immunotherapy, Metastatic Cancer, Nurses and Nursing Tips, Cancer Genetic Risk Assessment, Skincare, Educational Resources, CancerSupportiveCare Books, Authors and Contributors
Alexandra Andrews


RC266 - Nursing Tips, Self-Care
RC268.3 - Immunotherapy

RC268.6 - Cancer and Environment
RC268.15 - Chemoprevention
RC268.65 - Cancer Risk Assessment
RC268.7 - Alcohol and Cancer

RC269 - Secondary, Metastatic Cancers

RC270 - Educational Resources


RC266 - Nursing Tips, Self-Care
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RC266.B1.1 - Self-Care and Activities of Daily Living
Judy Bray, OC, Ernest H. Rosenbaum, MD
Assistive devices or gadgets to conserve energy for Eating, Drinking, Bathing, Dressing, Cooking, Toilet and Houswork Aids will help you develop independence and self-esteem. Satisfaction can be gained from recovering from and illness or injury. Check for safety in the home and keep emergency numbers. When you are tired and weak, it is all too easy to have an accident that could slow your recovery or even reverse your physical status dramatically.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/selfcare.html
First appeared 1999-05-01; updated 2008-07-15
RC266.H64.1 - Oncology Nursing Tips
Margaret Hawn, RN, BSN
When a life is touched by a cancer diagnosis, whether it be your own, a family member's, or a friend's, many questions immediately come to mind. Oftentimes the first concerns are about treatment issues such as, Will I have to have chemotherapy or radiation?, What is it like to get a treatment?
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/nurse.html
First appeared 2001-08-01; updated 2007-11-07
RC266.M211.1 - Bed Rest - Bed Positioning
Becky Moore, RN and Ernest H. Rosenbaum, MD
During sleep, we change position many times a night to keep muscles moving, stop cramping, stimulate blood circulation and prevent skin breakdown. Steps to avoid bedsores and muscle atrophy include - Choosing the right bed or mattress, Frequent change of position, An exercise program. If you are immobile and unable to turn over by yourself, it is important that your family helper understands the need for frequent repositioning - every two hours is a good rule of thumb. Heat and massage help increase the blood supply to the skin.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/bed.html
First appeared 2008-07-15; updated 2012-10-21
RC266.M211.2 - Bed Sore Prevention and Skin Care
Becky Moore, RN and Ernest H. Rosenbaum, MD
During sleep, we change position many times a night to keep muscles moving, stop cramping, stimulate blood circulation and prevent skin breakdown. Steps to avoid bedsores and muscle atrophy include - Choosing the right bed or mattress, Frequent change of position, An exercise program. If you are immobile and unable to turn over by yourself, it is important that your family helper understands the need for frequent repositioning - every two hours is a good rule of thumb. Heat and massage help increase the blood supply to the skin.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/bed.html
First appeared 2008-07-15; updated 2012-10-21

RC268.3 - Immunotherapy
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RC268.3 - Immunotherapy
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RC268.3.P54.1 - Immunotherapy Cancer Treatment
John W. Park, MD; Christopher C. Benz, MD
The concept of immunotherapy is based on the body's natural defense system, which protects us against a variety of diseases including cancer.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/immunotherapy.html
First appeared 2001-12-12; updated 2007-11-24

RC268.6 - Cancer and Environment
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RC268.6.K219.1 - Cancer Survivors and Toxins
Mary Kreger, DrPH and Katherine Sargent, BA Philip R. Lee Institute for Health Policy Studies, University of California, San Francisco
Exposure to tobacco, chemicals, some viruses and bacteria, certain hormones, alcohol, poor diet, and sunlight can increase the risk of cancer. Below are some lists of known carcinogens and their relationship to cancer. Advocacy and raising awareness more stringent regulation of environmental toxins can lead to decreases in carcinogens.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/toxin.html
First appeared 2008-09-24;

RC268.7 - Alcohol and Cancer
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RC268.7.R39.1 - Alcohol and Cancer Survivors
Ernest H. Rosenbaum, MD
Alcohol has been shown to be a small to modest cancer risk factor. Breast tissue is sensitive to estrogen and types of estrogen are known to stimulate the growth of breast cancer cells. Alcohol increases the need for folic acid. If you drink and smoke, you multiply the carcinogen effect of each substance and increase your risk of oral and throat cancer.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/Survivor/alcohol.html
First appeared 2007-12-09; updated 2008-08-02

RC268.15 - Chemoprevention
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RC268.15.R39.1 - Chemoprevention to Prevent Cancer
Ernest H. Rosenbaum, MD
Chemoprevention is a new, recent approach to cancer prevention. It is important to select those at very high risk and target this population for chemopreventive trials and treatment. Substantial gains have occurred in prevention for Breast, Colon, and Prostate cancers.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/chemoprevention.html
First appeared 2007-11-24

RC268.65 - Cancer Risk Assesment
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RC268.65.K86.1 - Cancer Risk Assessment
Patricia T. Kelly, PhD
Genetic cancer risk, What you hear, Hormonal Therapy, Secondary Cancers, Environment Information
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/risk.html
First appeared 2001-07-03; updated 2011-10-15
RC268.65.K86.2 - Cancer Risk Assessment Introduction
Patricia T. Kelly, PhD
Even though most cancers are not hereditary, in considering how cancers arise, we need to consider the genes.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/riskintro.html
First appeared 2001-07-03; updated 2011-10-15
RC268.65.R39.1 - Genetics and Cancer Survivorship
Ernest H. Rosenbaum, MD
Combination of environmental effects and genetic changes can proceed to develop cancer. Genetic counseling and testing may be used to evaluate your hereditary history and make appropriate recommendations. More than 90 percent of familial breast cancer cases are caused by DNA mutations in the BRCA1 or BRCA2 oncogenes
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/Survivor/genetic.html
First appeared 2007-12-05; updated 2008-08-02

RC269 - Secondary, Metastatic Cancers
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RC269.R39.1 - The Occurrence of a Second Cancer or a New Cancer in Cancer Survivors
Ernest H. Rosenbaum, MD
A new or a secondary cancer is related to specific risk factors - type of cancer and aggressiveness, genetic and family history, age, treatments such as surgery, chemotherapy, radiation, hormone replacement therapy. Includes warning signs for these cancers - Pulmonary, Oral, Head, Neck, Breast, Neurological, Brain, Hematological, Blood, Skin, Bone, Gastrointestinal, Genital, Urinary, Ovarian. A medical care provider relationship will improve chances of catching recurrent or new cancers at a more treatable stage.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/Survivor/second.html
First appeared 2007-12-10; updated 2008-08-02
RC269.V7.1 - Metastatic Cancer
Alan P. Venook, MD and Sabrina Selim, MD
When a cancer spreads (metastasizes) from its original site to another area of the body, it is termed metastatic cancer. Virtually all cancers have the potential to spread this way.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/metastatic.html
First appeared 2002-06-12; updated 2007-11-07



RC270 - Educational Resources
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RC270.H3.1 - Cancer Education and Information Resources
Susan Molloy Hubbard, BS, RN, MPA
You can never have enough information about every aspect of your disease. With decisive information, better care decisions can be made to guide you to optimal interventions.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/education.html
First appeared 1999-05-01; updated 2007-11-08

RC270.C8.1 - Cancer Supportive Care Authors and Contributors
Alexandra Andrews
Authors and Contributors to Cancer Supportive Care National and International Improving Quality of Life
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/contributors.html
First appeared 1999-05-01; updated 2010-12-13
RC270.C8.R39.1 - Cancer Supportive Care Books and Handouts
Ernest H. Rosenbaum, MD, Isadora R. Rosenbaum, MA, Malin Dollinger, MD, Margaret A. Tempero, MD, Sean Mulvihill, MD, Andrew C. von Eschenbach, MD, Susan Molloy Hubbard, BS, RN, MPA, Robert Wascher, MD, FACS, Craig Henderson, MD, Alexandra Andrews, Charles M. Dollbaum,MD, PhD, Karen Ritchie, MD, Sarah Schorr, RN, BSN, Francine Manuel, RPT, Jean Chan, BA, MA, Sed, Richard Shapiro, MD,Patricia Fobair, LCSW, MPH, Louise Maffett, BFA, Andrew Ko, MD, David Spiegel, MD, Holly Gautier, RN, Sandra J. Horning, MD, Julie Schwenka, PharmD, Sourcebooks, Andrews McMeel Publishing, Plexus
Everyones Guide to Cancer Supportive Care, Survivorship, and Therapy, Life After - A Roadmap for Cancer Survivors, The Legacy Project Capturing the Memories of the Past and Planning for the Future, Inner Fire: Your Will to Live: Stories of Courage, Hope, and Determination, You Are Not Alone (YANA), Mucositis: Problems and Solutions, Post Breast Therapy Pain Syndrome (PBTPS), and Using a Computer with cancer therapy complications, emphasize physical, psychological, social and spiritual health in the context of a life-threatening illness that can incapacitate and isolate people.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/bookorder.html
First appeared 2001-05-01; updated 2009-06-22
RC270.C8.R39.2 - Cancer Supportive Survivorship Care Web Site Copyright, Mission, and Privacy Statements
Ernest H. Rosenbaum, MD, Isadora R. Rosenbaum, MA, Alexandra Andrews, David Spiegel, MD
The mission of the Cancer Supportive Survivorship Care Web Site CSCW for Total Supportive Care is to provide multidisciplinary information and services for cancer patients and their families/friends
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/mission.html First appeared 1999-05-11; updated 2010-12-14
RC270.C8.R39.3 - Contact Information and Advisors for Cancer Supportive Care
Alexandra Andrews
This information from the Cancer Supportive Care Web Site should not be used for diagnosing or treating a health problem or a disease. It is not a substitute for professional care.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/contact.html
First appeared 1999-05-01; updated 2007-11-06


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First appeared May 7, 2007; updated October 21, 2012