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RC271.D-P33
Diet, Mucositis, Nutrition, Pain and Supportive Symptom Management Therapy
Alexandra Andrews


RC271,D52 - Diet and Nutrition RC271.P33 - Mucositis, Pain and Supportive Symptom Management


Diet and Nutrition
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RC271.D52.F18.1 - Ask Your Favorite Dietitian
Bernadette Festa, MS, RD
Taste may change with chemotherapy and some types of radiation therapy. People may experience changes in smell as well as taste perception because many cancer chemotherapy agents act by killing off rapidly dividing cells
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/diet.html
First appeared 2001-04-11; updated 2011-01-05
RC271.D52.F18.2 - Cancer Nutrition Issues
Bernadette Festa, RD, MS; Pat Kearney, RD; Isadora R. Rosenbaum, MA; and Ernest H Rosenbaum, MD
Good nutrition is needed for general good health and is particularly important when you are ill. During this time, it is important to give your body the proteins, fats, carbohydrates, vitamins and minerals it needs for energy, repair of normal tissue, and to keep your immune system strong to fight disease.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/nutrition.html
First appeared 1999-05-01; updated 2007-07-08; reviewed 2011-08-10
RC271.D52.F18.3 - Cancer Supportive Care Nutrition Program
American Dietetics Convention, St Louis, October 21, 2001

Bernadette Festa, RD, MS, Ernest H. Rosenbaum, MD, Isadora R. Rosenbaum, MA, Holly V. Gautier, RN, BSN, Margaret Hawn, RN, Pat Fobair, LCSW, Kathleen Dzubur, MS, Alexandra Andrews
Cancer Supportive Care, Stanford Center for Integrative Medicine , Stanford Hospital & Clinics
Cancer patients are at risk for various nutritional deficiencies and are a vulnerable group as to seeking out alternative resources. A Nutrition Program was designed in March of 2000 as a component of Cancer Supportive Care, Complementary Medicine Clinic at Stanford Medical Center, to provide free individual counseling, lectures, and web site presence.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/Abstracts/nutritionabstract.html
First appeared 2001-12-17; updated 2007-07-08
RC271.D52.L151.1 - Nutrition for Healthy Survivorship
Natalie Ledesma, MS, RD, CSO and Ernest H. Rosenbaum, MD
Lifestyle nutrition changes can help reduce the risk of recurrent and new cancers and promote survival. A prudent diet may also help eye and heart disease, and memory and cognition.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/Survivor/healthy.html
First appeared 2008-02-23; updated 2008-08-02
RC271.D52.L151.2 - Diet and Cancer Survivorship
Natalie Ledesma, MS, RD, CSO and Ernest H. Rosenbaum, MD
Adopting a healthy lifestyle - diet, physical activity, sleep habits, no tobacco, limited alcohol - can promote longevity, quality of life, reduce the risk of cancer, side effects, heart disease, diabetes, hypertension and stroke. Vitamin D protects against cancer, bone disease, heart disease, infections, inflammatory conditions, and multiple sclerosis. Essential fatty acids may play a critical role in the prevention and treatment of cancer and other chronic illnesses.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/dietsurvive.html
First appeared 2008-06-29
RC271.D52.L151.3 - Diet and Cancer Survivorship References
Natalie Ledesma, MS, RD, CSO and Ernest H. Rosenbaum, MD
Nutrition and exercise are two areas in which healthy lifestyle changes can help reduce the risk of recurrent and new cancers and promote survival and quality of life. Cancer survivors are at risk for developing secondary tumors, as well as multiple comorbid problems. Increase food intake of fruits, vegetables, legumes, and whole grains. There is a correlation between the risk of cancer and heart disease when the LDL cholesterol is elevated.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/dietsurviveref.html
First appeared 2008-06-29
RC271.D52.N233.1 - A Healthy Body Weight
Nora Norback, MPH, RD, Ernest H. Rosenbaum, MD and Lisa Tremont, MPH, RD
Be realistic when determining your desirable body weight and composition. Recognize differences such as genetics, age, gender, and muscle mass. A high Body Mass Index (BMI) is associated with heart disease, stroke, diabetes, and high blood pressure.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/weight.html
First appeared 2009-12-13;
RC271.D52.R39.1 - Diabetes - Diet and Health
Ernest H. Rosenbaum, MD
A small amount of weight loss can possibly avert a diabetic future. A loss of about 10% of body weight and three hours of weekly exercise can reduce diabetic risk by around 50-60%. Those who are overweight, who can't lose weight or keep it off on a low-fat diet, might do better on a low glycemic load diet.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/diabetes.html
First appeared 2007-05-20; updated 2007-07-12
RC271.D52.R39.2 - 2007 Concepts For Reducing Toxicity and Improving Survival
Ernest H. Rosenbaum, MD
2007 Diet and Nutrition Concepts for Bone Marrow Transplant, Stem Cell Transplant and Hematologic, Head and Neck, Lung. Pancreatic, Prostate and Upper Gastrointestinal Cancers
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/concept.html
First appeared 2007-06-12; updated 2007-07-08
RC271.D52.R39.3 - Wine and Health
Ernest H. Rosenbaum, MD
Red wine in moderation may help reduce the risk of heart attacks, mortality and Alzheimer diesease through an ingredient called resveratrol
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/wine.html
First appeared 2007-05-07; updated 2007-07-08
RC271.D52.R39.4 - Ways of Improving Nutrition During Cancer Therapy
Ernest H. Rosenbaum, MD
Nutrition is vital in cancer treatment. Side effects such as nausea, vomiting, loss of appetite, diarrhea, constipation and mucositis, lead to decreased energy, fatigue, slower healing, and recovery. It is important to get enough antioxidants in your diet.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/dietadvice.html
First appeared 2007-07-11
RC271.D52.R39.5 - Better Health Through Nutrition and Exercise
Ernest H. Rosenbaum, MD
Nutrition and Exercise benefit cardiovascular fitness, muscle strength, decrease fatigue and reduce anxiety, depression and improve self-esteem and quality of life. There is a decrease in cancer risk with increased phytochemicals, vitamins and minerals from whole foods. Frozen, canned, and fresh fruits and vegetables are healthy.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/fact.html
First appeared 2007-10-03

Mucositis, Pain and Supportive Symptom Management
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RC271.P33.R39.1 - Introduction to Mucositis - Oral, Esophageal and Gastrointestinal Problems and Solutions
Ernest H Rosenbaum, MD, Sol Silverman, MA, DDS, Bernadette Festa, MS, RD, Isadora R. Rosenbaum, MA, Julie Matel, MS, RD, Rosemary Elliott-Snow, RDH, and Robert J. Ignoffo, PharmD
Mucositis can occur anywhere along the digestive tract from the mouth to the anus, leaving the mucosal tissue open to ulceration and infection. Mucositis is further complicated by nausea and vomiting which often occurs with treatment. Chemotherapy, radiation and targeted therapies can affect the ability of cells to reproduce, slowing healing of the oral mucosa.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/mucositis.html
First appeared 2002-02-02; updated 2007-10-31; reviewed 2011-08-07
RC271.P33. R39.2 - Mucositis: Chemotherapy Problems and Solutions
Ernest H Rosenbaum, MD, Sol Silverman, MA, DDS, Bernadette Festa, MS, RD, Isadora R. Rosenbaum, M.A., Julie Matel, MS, RD, Rosemary Elliott-Snow, RDH, and Robert J. Ignoffo, Pharm D
Cancer therapy or cancer itself may cause changes in your body chemistry that result in a loss of appetite. Pain, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea or a sore or dry mouth may make eating difficult and cause loss of interest in food. Ideally, the physician, nurse or a registered dietitian should be working with the oncologist and yourself.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/drug.php
First appeared 2002-02-02; updated 2007-10-31; reviewed 2011-08-07
RC271.P33.R39.3 - Mucositis: Esophageal and Gastrointestinal Problems and Solutions
Ernest H Rosenbaum, MD, Sol Silverman, MA, DDS, Bernadette Festa, MS, RD, Isadora R. Rosenbaum, M.A., Julie Matel, MS, RD, Rosemary Elliott-Snow, RDH, and Robert J. Ignoffo, Pharm D
A normal high-protein, high-calorie diet with supplements as needed will help your sore mouth or tongue heal faster. Drinking lots of fluids will also help with healing as well as making your mouth sores more comfortable
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/gastro.php
First appeared 2002-02-02; updated 2007-10-31; reviewed 2011-08-07
RC271.P33.R39.4 - Mucositis: Oral Problems and Solutions
Ernest H Rosenbaum, MD, Sol Silverman, MA, DDS, Bernadette Festa, MS, RD, Isadora R. Rosenbaum, MA, Julie Matel, MS, RD, Rosemary Elliott-Snow, RDH, and Robert J. Ignoffo, PharmD
Adequate nutrition can be challenging for patients with cancer. Physical problems may interfere with food intake and proper nutrition. Patients with mouth or throat pain can interfere with chewing and compound difficulties in swallowing. Tooth and gum disease further complicate the problem. A resultant weight loss tends to weakness, inactivity, discouragement, further anorexia, and susceptibility to infection.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/oral.php
First appeared 2002-02-02; updated 2007-10-31; reviewed 2011-08-07
RC271.P33.R39.5 - Mucositis and Targeted Therapies
Ernest H Rosenbaum, MD
New patient toxicities occur when targeted therapies usually monoclonal antibodies or small molecules such as tyrosine kinase inhibitors are given in conjunction with more traditional chemotherapy drugs. Mucosal injury can be a combination of either or both with mouth ulcers and diarrhea prominent.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/target.html
First appeared 2007-07-31; updated 2007-08-10; reviewed 2011-08-07
RC271.P33.S56.1 - Handout Mucositis: Problems and Solutions - page 1
Julie Schwenka, PharmD, Ernest H. Rosenbaum, MD, Alexandra Andrews, Charles M. Dollbaum, MD, PhD and Robert J. Ignoffo, PharmD
It is important to know who is at risk of mucositis and to prevent complications to help improve quality of life and maximize your therapy. These risk factors include radiation to the head and neck, high dose chemotherapy, bone marrow transplantation, certain single agent anti-cancer drugs or a combination of these. Symptoms of mucositis should be treated as soon as they appear. It is important to be educated about proper nutrition and oral hygiene to help prevent or lessen these symptoms. Once you are aware of proper nutrition, you will be able to maintain adequate hydration, maintain your immunity and help prevent nausea as well as protecting your teeth
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/mucositispage1.pdf
First appeared 2005-11-20; updated 2007-07-08; reviewed 2011-08-07
RC271.P33.S56.2 - Handout Mucositis: Problems and Solutions - page 2
Julie Schwenka, PharmD, Ernest H. Rosenbaum, MD, Alexandra Andrews, Charles M. Dollbaum, MD, PhD and Robert J. Ignoffo, PharmD
It is important to know who is at risk of mucositis and to prevent complications to help improve quality of life and maximize your therapy. These risk factors include radiation to the head and neck, high dose chemotherapy, bone marrow transplantation, certain single agent anti-cancer drugs or a combination of these. Symptoms of mucositis should be treated as soon as they appear. It is important to be educated about proper nutrition and oral hygiene to help prevent or lessen these symptoms. Once you are aware of proper nutrition, you will be able to maintain adequate hydration, maintain your immunity and help prevent nausea as well as protecting your teeth
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/mucositispage2.pdf
First appeared 2005-11-20; updated 2007-07-08; reviewed 2011-08-07
RC271.P33.S56.3 - Handout Mucositis: Problems and Solutions
Julie Schwenka, PharmD, Ernest H. Rosenbaum, MD, Alexandra Andrews, Charles M. Dollbaum, MD, PhD and Robert J. Ignoffo, PharmD
It is important to know who is at risk of mucositis and to prevent complications to help improve quality of life and maximize your therapy. These risk factors include radiation to the head and neck, high dose chemotherapy, bone marrow transplantation, certain single agent anti-cancer drugs or a combination of these. Symptoms of mucositis should be treated as soon as they appear. It is important to be educated about proper nutrition and oral hygiene to help prevent or lessen these symptoms. Once you are aware of proper nutrition, you will be able to maintain adequate hydration, maintain your immunity and help prevent nausea as well as protecting your teeth
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/mucositishandout.php
First appeared 2005-12-02; updated 2007-10-31; reviewed 2011-08-07


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First appeared January 31, 2007; updated August 10, 2011