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RC280-282
Bile Duct, Breast, Childhood, Gall Bladder, Geriatric (Aging) Hodgkin Lymphoma, Liver, Lung, Prostate, Pancreas (Pancreatic), Skin, and Stomach (Gastric) Cancers
Alexandra Andrews


RC280.B48 - Bile Duct and Gall Bladder Cancer
RC280.B8 - Breast Cancer

RC280.L5 - Liver Cancer
RC280.L8 - Lung Cancer

RC280.L9 - Hodgkin's Lymphoma Cancer
RC280.P7 - Prostate Cancer
PC280.P25 - Pancreas (Pancreatic) Cancer

RC280.S5 - Skin Cancer
RC280.S8 - Stomach (Gastric) Cancer

RC281.A34 - Geriatric (Aging) Cancer
RC281.C4 - Childhood Cancer


Bile Duct and Gall Bladder Cancer
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RC280.B48.V7.1 - Bile Duct Cancer
Alan P. Venook, MD, Sabrina Selim, MD
Bile duct cancers, also called cholangiocarcinomas, may arise in many locations in and around the liver. A patient's prognosis depends largely on where the tumor begins and how large it has grown by the time of diagnosis.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/bileduct.html
First appeared 2002-06-21; updated 2007-08-19
RC280.B48.V7.2 - Cancer of The Gall Bladder
Alan P. Venook, MD, Sabrina Selim, MD
Gall bladder cancer is usually not found until it is at an advanced stage and cannot be surgically removed. In the advanced stages, pain relief and the restoration of normal bile flow from the liver into the intestines are the principal goals of therapy.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/gallbladder.html
First appeared 2002-06-13; updated 2007-08-19

RC280.B8 - Breast Cancer
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RC280.B8.B1.1 - Activities of Daily Living for Post Breast Therapy
Judy Bray, OC and Mary Godfrey, OTR
Specific daily living and self-care skills should be incorporated into your exercise program. Your goal is to resume your normal way of daily life
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/adl.html
First appeared 1999-05-01; updated 2007-08-19
RC280.B8.B24.1 - Impact of aging on the biology of breast cancer - Part 1
Christopher Benz, MD
Breast cancer is a heterogeneous malignancy; its age-specific incidence profile rises exponentially until menopause and increases more slowly thereafter, reflecting the superimposition of early-onset and late-onset breast cancer rates. Geroscience is still in its infancy. Emergent molecular and cellular hypotheses put forth to explain the cancer-aging relationship are of interest but remain largely untested.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/breastage1.html
First appeared 2008-02-18
RC280.B8.B24.2 - Impact of aging on the biology of breast cancer - Part 2
Christopher Benz, MD
Initial studies comparing early-onset and late-onset ER-positive breast cancers for DNA mutations and whole genome aberrations as well as RNA transcriptome differences suggest that epigenetic changes rather than genotypic variation account for most of the age-dependent biological and clinical differences observed in hormone-dependent breast cancer.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/breastage2.html
First appeared 2008-02-18
RC280.B8.B24.3 - Impact of aging on the biology of breast cancer - Acknowledgments, Biography and References
Christopher Benz, MD
Director of the Buck Institute's Program on Cancer and Developmental Therapeutics, Dr. Benz's translational research program focuses on identifying molecular strategies to improve breast cancer diagnostics and therapeutics, with a special emphasis on trying to understand and interrupt the link between breast cancer and aging, Also incudes Acknowledgments and References
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/breastageref.html
First appeared 2008-02-18
RC280.B8.B24.4 - Impact of aging on the biology of breast cancer - PDF version
Christopher Benz, MD
Breast cancer is a heterogeneous malignancy; its age-specific incidence profile rises exponentially until menopause and increases more slowly thereafter, reflecting the superimposition of early-onset and late-onset breast cancer rates.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/breastage.pdf
First appeared 2008-02-18
RC280.B8.G76.1 - Breast Cancer Epidemiology and Hormone Replacement Therapy and Breast Cancer
Mindy Goldman, MD
Overview of Breast Cancer Epidemiology and Hormone Replacement Therapy, and Oral Contraceptives
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/breasthrt.html
First appeared 2002-10-02; updated 2007-08-19
RC280.B8.K86.1 - What You Hear And What It Really Means
Patricia T. Kelly, PhD
In the US, the average woman has a 1 in 8 or 1 in 9 risk of breast cancer. Actually, the average woman's risk is 2% up to age 50 and 11% to age 80.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/hear.html
First appeared 2001-07-03; updated 2007-08-19
RC280.B8.K86.2 - Hormone Replacement Therapy
Patricia T. Kelly, PhD
An understanding of the studies on hormone replacement therapy (HRT) and breast cancer risk is essential to help women make informed decisions about hormone use and prophylactic oophorectomy.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/hrt.html
First appeared 2001-08-28; updated 2007-08-19
RC280.B8.M41.1 - Post Breast Therapy Rehabilitation Exercises
Francine Manuel, RPT and Lisa Glassberg (Demonstrator)
The following exercise program will help initiate your recovery. You can begin exercising as soon as you have permission from your physician
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/breastexercise.html
First appeared 2002-06-12; updated 2007-08-19
RC280.B8.M98.1 - Frequently Asked Questions about Tamoxifen
Sharon Mitchell, PharmD, UCSF &  Robert Ignoffo, PharmD, Clinical Professor UCSF
The hormone, estrogen, enters many normal cells including mammary (breast) cells and signals growth and multiplication. In breast cancer, this growth is accelerated. Tamoxifen is an anti-estrogen
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/tamoxifen.html
First appeared 2003-01-09; updated 2007-08-19
RC280.B8.R39.1 - Breast Cancer and Side Effects
Ernest H. Rosenbaum, MD
Information about breast cancer evaluation, side effects of treatments including sexual and cognitive dysfunction, osteoporosis, osteonecrosis, cardiovascular events, secondary cancers and recurrences and recommended guidelines for follow up.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/breastside.html
First appeared 2007-08-21
RC280.B8.T34.1 - New Hormonal Therapy - the Aromatase Inhibitors
Debu Tripathy, MD
Manipulating the function of hormones, particularly estrogen has long been a useful tool in treating breast cancer
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/aromatase.html
First appeared 2002-03-20; updated 2007-08-19
RC280.B8.W90.1 - Overview Of The Sentinel Lymph Node Concept
Robert A. Wascher, MD, FACS
Sentinel Lymph Node mapping has revolutionized the care of patients with melanoma, and more recently, breast cancer patients as well
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/sentinelnode.html
First appeared 2002-10-20; updated 2007-08-19

RC280.L5 - Liver Cancer
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RC280.L5.V7.1 - Cancer of the Liver
Alan P. Venook, MD, Sabrina Selim, MD
Primary liver cancer-also called hepatocellular carcinoma or hepatoma-may be the most common cancer worldwide. It occurs with great frequency in Asia and Africa and is becoming more common in the United States as a complication of chronic Hepatitis C.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/liver.html First appeared 2002-06-18; updated 2007-08-19

RC280.L8 - Lung Cancer
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RC280.L8.J103.1 - Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer
Thierry M. Jahan, MD, Alan B. Glassberg, MD, Patricia Cornett, MD, Daphne Haas-Kogan, MD, Peter Anastassiou, MD, Sabrina Selim, MD and David Jablons, MD
Non Small Cell Lung cancer accounts for 80 percent of all lung cancer cases. There has been modest improvement in the survival rate over the past two decades. We lack a satisfactory, widely applicable, screening test that could increase our ability to detect lung cancer at an early stage, when it has the best chance of being cured and the fact that lung cancer is a biologically aggressive cancer.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/nonsmallcell.html
First appeared 2002-08-12; updated 2007-08-19
RC280.L8.J103.2 - Small Cell Lung Cancer
Thierry M. Jahan, MD, Alan B. Glassberg, MD, Patricia Cornett, MD, Daphne Haas-Kogan, MD, Peter Anastassiou, MD, Sabrina Selim, MD and David Jablons, MD
Small cell lung cancer accounts for about a 20% of all lung cancer cases. Also called oat cell carcinoma of the lung, it has the most rapid clinical course of any type of lung cancer
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/smallcell.html
First appeared 2002-08-12; updated 2008-10-13
RC280.L8.R39.1 - 2006 - Lung Cancer Update Information
Ernest H. Rosenbaum, MD
Chemotherapy in elderly patients, using single drug therapy leads to significant improvement in one-year survival and quality of life.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/lung2006.html
First appeared 2006-03-08; updated 2007-08-19

RC280.L9 - Hodgkin's Lymphoma Cancer
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RC280.L9.R39.1 - Hodgkin's Lymphoma and Late Morbidity
Ernest H. Rosenbaum, MD
Hodgkins lymphoma patients should expect a long-term survival. The new treatment goal is to minimize morbidity of the major consequences of second malignancies and premature heart disease while increasing disease-free survival and cure rate.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/hodgkins.html
First appeared 2007-08-19; updated 2008-10-13

RC280.P7 - Prostate Cancer
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RC280.P7.L151.1 - Nutrition and Prostate Cancer
Natalie Ledesma, MS, RD, CSO
Good nutrition may help reduce the risk of prostate cancer progression. Studies are being conducted to help understand how diet and prostate cancer are related. Improved nutrition reduces risk of heart disease, diabetes, and obesity, and usually improves overall quality of life.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/prostatediet.html
First appeared 2006-01-10; updated 2007-08-19
RC280.P7.L151.2 - Nutrition and Prostate Cancer High Fiber Sources and Recipes
Natalie Ledesma, MS, RD, CSO
Fruit, Vegetable, Grains High Fiber Diet Sources and Recipes including a Three Day Meal Plan
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/highfiber.html
First appeared 2006-01-10; updated 2007-08-19
RC280.P7.L151.3 - Nutrition and Prostate Cancer Resources
Natalie Ledesma, MS, RD, CSO
Books, Cookbooks, Newsletters, Websites and References for Nutrtion and Prostate Cancer
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/prostateresource.html
First appeared 2006-01-10; updated 2007-08-19
RC280.P7.L151.4 - Nutrition and Prostate Cancer - PDF Version
Natalie Ledesma, MS, RD, CSO
Good nutrition may help reduce the risk of prostate cancer progression
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/nutritionprostate.pdf
First appeared 2006-01-10
RC280.P7.L151.5 - Diet and Prostate Cancer
Natalie Ledesma, MS, RD, CSO
A healthy plant based diet may reduce the risk of developing prostate disease, cancer, progression, and lower PSA, Men who made comprehensive lifestyle changes improved their quality of life.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/prostatehealth.html
First appeared 2008-03-16; updated 2008-03-17
RC280.P7.L151.6 - Diet and Prostate Cancer References
Natalie Ledesma, MS, RD, CSO
References for Diet and Prostate Cancer - Reducing the risk of cancer with healthy food choices and physical activity.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/prostatehealthref.html
First appeared 2008-03-16
RC280.P7.R39.1 - Prostate Cancer Issues
Ernest H. Rosenbaum, MD
Androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT) is the standard treatment for prostate cancer. Bone complications, hot flashes, loss of libido, sexual dysfunction and psychosocial issues are not uncommon
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/prostate.html
First appeared 2007-04-19

Pancreas (Pancreatic) Cancer
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RC280.P25.K70.1 - Pancreas (Pancreatic) Cancer
Andrew H. Ko, MD
Pancreatic cancer is the fifth leading cause of cancer-related mortality in the United States, On a stage for stage basis, cancer of the pancreas is met with the shortest median survival time out of all cancer types. In fact, the annual mortality rate almost approximates the annual incidence rate, which reflects the generally short survival time associated with pancreatic cancer, most often less than one year.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/pancreas.html
First appeared 2003-02-17; updated 2008-03-19

RC280.S5 - Skin Cancers
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RC280.S5.G177.1 - Skin Cancers and Sun Exposure
Bernard Gordon, MD and Ernest H. Rosenbaum, MD
Skin cancers are one of the most common second cancers, especially for those treated with radiation therapy. There are three basic types of skin cancer: basal cell, squamous cell, and melanoma. The best cure for skin cancer remains early detection, prompt treatment, and follow-up preventative care measures.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/Survivor/skin.html
First appeared 2007-12-11; updated 2008-08-02
RC280.S5.G177.2 - Sunshine
Bernard Gordon, MD and Ernest H. Rosenbaum, MD
Sun damage causes cosmetic skin changes associated with aging - wrinkles, leathery appearance, irregular pigmentation, age spots, and may lead to skin cancer. Ultraviolet rays - UVA and UVB - penetrate the epidermis, causing sunburn and skin cancer. Prevention of skin aging and cancer can make your life healthier and longer.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/sunshine.html
First appeared 2009-12-22;
RC280.S5.M227.1 - Sun Exposure: The Prevention of Skin Cancer
Mohamed Kashini, MD, Bernard Gordon, MD and Ernest H. Rosenbaum, MD
Survivors should take extra care to protect their skin from sun exposure. Skin cancers are common second cancers, especially for those treated with radiation therapy. The best cure remains early detection, prompt treatment, and follow-up preventive care measures. Protect yourself from sun rays - avoid peak hours of ultraviolet radiation and tanning booths, wear sunscreen and protective clothing.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/Survivorship/sun.html
First appeared 2009-09-09; updated 2010-05-29

RC280.S8 - Stomach(Gastric) Cancer
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RC280.S8.K70.1 - Stomach (Gastric) Cancer
Andrew H. Ko, MD
Stomach cancers are classified according to their tissue type. Overwhelmingly, the most common type of stomach cancers are gastric adenocarcinomas, which arise from the glandular tissue lining the stomach. Occurring much more rarely are gastric lymphomas also referred to as MALTomas or mucosal associated lymphoid tissue tumors, carcinoids, and sarcomas. The ability to distinguish between these types of cancers is a critical one, as the specific treatment for each may differ significantly
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/stomach.html
First appeared 2003-02-17; updated 2008-03-19

RC281.A34 Geriatric (Aging) Cancer
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RC281.A34.R39.1 - Geriatric Oncology
Ernest H. Rosenbaum, MD
Elderly and aging cancer patients need a comprehensive geriatric assessment. Comorbid conditions affect survival. Control of hypertension, diabetes, heart and lung disease are vital components of both psychological and functional status.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/Geriatric/geriatric.html
First appeared 2007-07-24; updated 2007-11-30
RC281.A34.R39.2 - Elderly Oncology Introduction
Ernest H. Rosenbaum, MD
More than half the new cancers diagnosed occur in the elderly. There is a need for a comprehensive geriatric assessment program. Older patients with cancer often require functional assistance. The need increases as cancer survivors age. The use of the Karnofsky or ECOG Performance Status is of help in the assessment.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/Geriatric/elder.html
First appeared 2007-11-30
RC281.A34.R39.3 - Geriatric Cancers Index
Ernest H. Rosenbaum, MD
Comorbid conditions affect survival in elderly and aging cancer patients. There is a need for a CGA - comprehensive geriatric assessment program. Control of hypertension, diabetes, heart and lung disease are vital components of both psychological and functional status. The use of the Karnofsky or ECOG Performance Status is of help in the assessment.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/Geriatric/index.html
First appeared 2007-11-30; updated 2008-10-13
RC281.A34.R39.4 - Cancer Facts and Aging
Ernest H. Rosenbaum, MD
Barriers and Outcomes in the Management of Cancer Survivors and Deconditioning: A Major Problem with Cancer Patients also includes information on the treatment of the elderly.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/Geriatric/aging.html
First appeared 2007-04-19; updated 2008-02-20
RC281.A34.R39.5 - Elderly Cancer Survivorship
Ernest H. Rosenbaum, MD
Aging and elderly cancer patients are the largest recipients of chemotherapy. Vulnerable older survivors may require functional assistance, live in unsafe situations, have cognitive problems and depression. Comorbid conditions play a major role in geriatric care and survival.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/Survivorship/elderly.html
First appeared 2009-12-27;

RC281.C4 - Childhood Cancer
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RC281.C4.R39.1 - Challenges for Childhood Cancer Survivors
Ernest H. Rosenbaum, MD
Childhood survivors are likely to develop severe and life threatening chronic health conditions such as congestive heart failure, ovaries and testes failure, second cancers and thought-process problems. Studies report an extraordinarily high incidence of late and often permanent complications following treatment with combination chemotherapy and ionizing radiation. The impact of some of these chronic health problems can be reduced with scheduled surveillance, screening, appropriate treatment, and lifestyle changes.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/Survivor/child.html
First appeared 2007-12-11; updated 2008-08-02
RC281.C4.R39.2 - Childhood and Adolescent Cancer Survivorship
Ernest H. Rosenbaum, MD
Childhood and adolescent long-term survivor issues are late morbidity and mortality secondary to either recurrence of the primary disease, second malignancies, or toxicities from surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Healthy behavior and lifestyle modifications could potentially decrease the risk of comorbidities and help promote a healthier longevity.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/Survivorship/childhood.html
First appeared 2009-08-31;


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First appeared January 19, 2007; updated December 13, 2010