Fifth Dimension    Site Map    Search    Contact Us
graphic to create line
Cancer Supportive and Survivorship Care Programs Improving Quality of Life Logo

Advanced Search
SiteMap

RC600-950
Aging and Older Adult Issues, Anemia, Bronchoscopy, Chemical Pleurodesis, Coronary Heart Disease, Diabetes Mellitus, Dyspnea, Hypertension (High Blood Pressure), Incontinence, Infertility, Lymphedema, Obesity, Osteoporosis, Reproduction, and more
Alexandra Andrews


RC628 - Obesity
RC641 - Anemia

RC646 - Lymphedema
RC660 - Diabetes Mellitus

RC685.C6 - Coronary Heart Disease
RC685.H8 - Hypertension (High Blood Pressure)
RC734-751 - Bronchoscopy, Chemical Pleurodesis and Dyspnea
RC889 - Infertility and Reproduction

RC921 - Incontinence
RC931 - Osteoporosis

RC952 - Aging, Chronic disorders, and Older Adulthood Issues


RC628 Obesity
Back to the Table of Contents


RC628.R39.1 - Obesity
Ernest H. Rosenbaum, MD
When you lose weight you can reduce your cancer risk and promote your longevity. Excess fats in your diet can create free radicals that can damage cell membranes. Fruits and vegetables in the diet contain phytochemicals that help neutralize excess free radicals. Comorbid diseases are also related to excess weight, including high blood pressure, type 2 diabetes, stroke, heart disease, and gallbladder disease.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/Survivor/obesity.html
First appeared 2008-01-15; updated 2008-08-02

RC641 Anemia
Back to the Table of Contents


RC641.R39.1 - Anemia Causes and Treatment
Ernest H. Rosenbaum, MD
Anemia is associated with fatigue - a feeling of weakness or diminished physical and mental capacity unrelieved by rest (fatigue). Additional symptoms include diminished ability to perform daily functions and possibly impaired cognitive function
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/anemiacause.html
First appeared 2003-09-23; updated 2008-07-15
RC641.R39.2 - A Simple Anemia Overview
Ernest H. Rosenbaum, MD
Anemia is defined as a pathologic deficiency in the oxygen-carrying material of the blood
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/anemiaintro.html
First appeared 2003-01-05; updated 2008-07-15

RC641.R39.3 - Supportive Care For Anemias In Cancer Patients
Ernest H. Rosenbaum, MD
Cancer is an inflammatory process giving rise to many chronic conditions such as anemia. Cancer therapies, such as radiation or chemotherapy, decrease bone marrow production of red blood cells as well as a decreased ability to respond to erythropoietin. Cancer patients often lose blood due to surgery or become anemic from poor nutrition, chemotherapy and hormonal therapy.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/anemiasupport.html
First appeared 2006-03-28; updated 2008-07-15
RC641.R39.4 - Anemia Issues
Ernest H. Rosenbaum, MD
Anemia is associated with fatigue - a feeling of weakness or diminished physical and mental capacity unrelieved by rest (fatigue). Additional symptoms include diminished ability to perform daily functions and possibly impaired cognitive function, headache, dizziness, chest pain and shortness of breath, nausea, depression and occasionally pain. These symptoms are often complicated by coexisting disease
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/anemia.html
First appeared 1999-05-01; updated 2008-07-15

RC646 Lymphedema
Back to the Table of Contents


RC646.A8.1 - Lymphedema: A Cancer Survivor Issue
Alexandra Andrews, John P. Cooke, MD, PhD, Andrzej Szuba, MD, PhD, Ernest H. Rosenbaum, MD and Robert A. Wascher, MD, FACS
Lymphedema is a chronic health problem that may cause pain, fatigue, loss of function, disfigurement with self-image problems, distress, and anxiety. Lymphatic vessels are no longer able to drain lymph fluid efficiently from an extremity or trunk, resulting in swelling.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/Survivorship/lymphsurvive.html
First appeared 2009-08-19;
RC646.C53.1 - Lymphedema Overview
John P. Cooke, MD, PhD, Andrzej Szuba, MD, PhD, Stanley G. Rockson, MD and Gary Abrams, MD
Lymphedema is a swelling caused by a buildup of fluid (lymph) in the soft tissues of the limbs. This buildup often occurs after surgical removal of lymph nodes or after radiation therapy to lymph nodes because of damage to the lymphatic system
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/lymphover.php
First appeared 1999-05-01; updated 2007-10-31
RC646.C53.2 - Lymphedema Guide
John P. Cooke, MD, PhD, Andrzej Szuba, MD, PhD, Ernest H. Rosenbaum, MD
Lymphedema is a chronic problem causing distress, pain, and loss of function, anxiety, and daily reminder of a persistent cancer problem. It may develop soon after surgery or radiotherapy or months or years post therapy.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/lymphguide.php
First appeared 2006-08-07; updated 2007-10-31
RC646.C53.3 - Lymphedema
John P. Cooke, MD, PhD, Andrzej Szuba, MD, PhD, Alexandra Andrews, Ernest H. Rosenbaum, MD
Lymphedema, swelling in the soft tissues of the limbs, is a chronic problem that may cause distress, pain, loss of function, disability, disfigurement with self-image problems, and anxiety. It may develop soon after surgery or radiotherapy or even months or years after therapy. Emotional problems associated with lymphedema are not uncommon especially with adolescent patients.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/lymphissue.html
First appeared 2007-12-19; updated 2008-08-02
RC646.M41.1 - Lower Body Lymphedema
Francine Manuel, RPT
Lymphedema of the lower extremities can be a debilitating condition...prostate, lung, liver, lymphomas, ovarian and abdominal cancers can cause swelling of the legs which can come from any compression or surgical removal of the lymph nodes.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/lowerlymph.php
First appeared 2002-11-25; updated 2007-10-31
RC646.R39.1 - Lymphedema Issues Module
Ernest H. Rosenbaum, MD, Sabrina S. Selim, MD, Francine Manuel, RTP, Cheryl Ewing, MD, Gary Abrams, MD, Alexandra Andrews, Robert A. Wascher, MD, FACS, Stanley G. Rockson, MD, Andrzej Szuba, MD, PhD, and John P. Cooke, MD, PhD
Lymphedema is a swelling caused by a buildup of lymph in the soft tissues of the limbs, because of damage to the lymphatic system. Lymphedema is most often seen after surgical or radiation therapy for breast, prostate, lung, liver, ovarian, lymphomas, cervical, melanoma, and testicular cancers. Living with lymphedema is challenging on a variety of psychological levels. Secondary side effect are production of fluid into the abdomen - ascites - pain, problems using a computer.
shttp://www.cancersupportivecare.com/lymphedema.html
First appeared 1999-05-01; updated 2009-08-19
RC646.S95.1 - Introduction and Treatments for Lymphedema
Sabrina S. Selim, MD, Francine Manuel, RPT, Cheryl Ewing, MD, Ernest H. Rosenbaum, MD
A normal lymphatic system consists of blind-end vessels which collect the fluid that bathes and nourish the tissues. They help to destroy bacteria, cancerous cells or other wastes that make their way into this lymph fluid
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/lymph.php
First appeared 2002-08-12; updated 2007-09-15
RC646.S95.2 - Living with Lymphedema
Sabrina S. Selim, MD, Francine Manuel, RPT, Cheryl Ewing, MD, Ernest H. Rosenbaum, MD
Living with lymphedema is challenging on a variety of psychological levels. Several women stated that they had a harder time enduring/suffering through the reformulation of self following the advent of lymphedema than their diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/lymphlive.php
First appeared 2002-06-01; updated 2009-07-08
RC646.S95.3 - Lymphedema Issues References
Sabrina S. Selim, MD, Francine Manuel, RPT, Cheryl Ewing, MD, Ernest H. Rosenbaum, MD
References for Cancer Supportive Care Lymphedema Issues
shttp://www.cancersupportivecare.com/lymphref.html
First appeared 2002-06-01; updated 2004-09-30



RC660 Diabetes Mellitus
Back to the Table of Contents


RC660.R183.1 - Diabetes Mellitus
Robert J. Rushakoff, MD, FACP
Diabetes mellitus a chronic disease - the body is not able to store and use sugar leading to hyperglycemia, high levels of glucose in the blood. The goal is to keep blood glucose as close to normal as possible with a healthy diet and exercise, reducing progression and complications of diabetes such as - retinopathy, nephropathy, neuropathy, atherosclerosis and strokes. When diabetics aggressively control their blood pressure and cholesterol levels, the risk of cardiovascular disease decreases dramatically.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/Survivor/diabetic.html
First appeared 2008-01-08; updated 2008-08-02
RC660.R183.2 - Diabetes Mellitus
Robert J. Rushakoff, MD, FACP and Ernest H. Rosenbaum, MD
Diabetes can lead to eye disease, kidney disease, and nerve damage, and is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease and cancer. You need to take action, about your risk factors - blood glucose, cholesterol, and blood pressure levels with control of blood sugar levels through diet modifications and exercise for the best option for a healthy life.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/Survivorship/diabetics.html
First appeared 2009-10-20;

RC685.C6 Coronary Heart Disease
Back to the Table of Contents


RC685.C6.M184.1 - Heart Disease
Gary F. Milechman, MD, FACC and Jay S. Luxenberg, MD
We can eliminate much of the death and disability caused by heart disease. Coronary artery atherosclerosis is the process that leads to heart attacks, chest pain, angina, sudden death. Fatty deposits in blood vessels can be reduced with diet, exercise and stress reduction.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/Survivor/heart.html
First appeared 2008-01-08; updated 2008-08-02
RC685.C6.M184.2 - Cardiovascular Heart Disease
Gary F. Milechman, MD, FACC and Jay S. Luxenberg, MD
Lifestyle changes of diet, exercise and stress reduction prevent and regress atherosclerosis. Improvements were found in patients with the most severe fatty deposits in the walls of their blood vessels. If needed, use cholesterol lowering medications to decrease chances of heart attack, stroke or death.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/Survivorship/cardiac.html
First appeared 2009-09-19;

RC685.H8 Hypertension (High Blood Pressure)
Back to the Table of Contents


RC685.H8.M184.1 - Hypertension (High Blood Pressure)
Gary F. Milechman, MD, FACC and Ernest H. Rosenbaum, MD
Hypertension is one of the major risk factors for strokes, heart attacks, heart failure and aneurysms and is a leading cause of chronic renal (kidney) failure. Even moderate elevation of arterial blood pressure leads to a shortened life expectancy.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/Survivorship/hypertension.html
First appeared 2009-09-11; updated 2009-09-17

RC734-751 Bronchoscopy, Chemical Pleurodesis and Dyspnea
Back to the Table of Contents


RC734.C2.1 - Bronchoscopy Introduction
Carolyn Clary-Macy, RN, OCN, UCSF Thoracic Surgery
Your doctor might order a test called a bronchoscopy. This test uses a thin, flexible lighted tube called a bronchoscope to look inside your lungs. It is usually done to help the doctor diagnose a lung problem
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/bronchoscopy.html
First appeared 2003-03-02; updated 2007-11-08


RC751.C2.2 - Chemical Pleurodesis for Malignant Pleural Effusion
Carolyn Clary-Macy, RN, OCN
A pleural effusion is an abnormal accumulation of fluid in the pleural space the area between the two layers parietal and visceral pleura covering the lung.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/pleural.html
First appeared 2002-01-16; updated 2007-11-08


RC776.R39.1 - Dyspnea Supportive Care for Cancer Patients
Ernest H. Rosenbaum, MD
Difficulty breathing can happen, if a cancer progresses and blocks or compromises the respiratory system. Many patients are even short of breath while resting and require oxygen support.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/dyspnea.html
First appeared 2006-04-09;
RC776.R217.1 - Managing Dyspnea
Michael W. Rabow, MD
Director, Symptom Management Service, Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco
Difficulty breathing, Dyspnea, can originate from both chemical and mechanical receptors in the lungs, chest wall, muscles, brain, and face. Dyspnea is common with pulmonary diseases that impact the lungs - Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD), Lung Cancer, Advanced cancer, Metastases, Pulmonary edema, Congestive Heart Failure, Fluid overload, Pneumonia, Asthma, Pneumothorax, Scarring from radiotherapy, Tumor growth, and Pleural effusions. Dyspneic people may be breathless also from - Severe anemia, Obesity, Urinary retention, Constipation, Muscle weakness, Fatigue, Anxiety and Pain. Suffocation is one of the most dreaded fears people have about the end of life. Opioids are the medications of choice for treating dyspnea. Support groups, therapy, relaxation techniques, education, and even simple reassurance can help.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/dyspneic.html
First appeared 2008-08-04;

RC889 - Infertility and Reproduction
Back to the Table of Contents


RC889.R179.1 - Infertility
Mitchell Rosen, MD and Ernest H. Rosenbaum, MD
Fertility is a possibility for many cancer survivors with new treatment options. Cancer therapies can cause a spectrum of damage to the reproductive axis. The most important step is for the patient to discuss future pregnancy plans and conncerns with their doctor. Infertility can be an emotionally devastating experience.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/Survivor/infertility.html
First appeared 2007-12-18; updated 2008-08-02
RC889.R179.2 - Cancer Survivor Fertility
Mitchell Rosen, MD and Ernest H. Rosenbaum, MD
New treatment options are making fertility a possibility for many cancer survivors. Cancer therapy effects will depend on age, type of cancer, and method of treatment.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/Survivorship/fertility.html
First appeared 2009-09-27;

RC921 - Incontinence - Urinary and Fecal
Back to the Table of Contents


RC921.I5.R39.1 - Incontinence - Urinary and Fecal
Ernest H. Rosenbaum, MD and Cigal Kadoch, BA
Incontinence can have a devastating psychological, physical effect and economic impact. Embarrassment and stigma may cause people to limit activities, withdraw from social life, family and friends into isolation. Lifestyle changes, behavioral modifications, medical and possibly surgical treatments can relieve urinary and fecal incontinence.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/Survivorship/incontinent.html
First appeared 2009-09-20;

RC931 - Osteoporosis
Back to the Table of Contents


RC931.K40.1 - Introduction to Osteoporosis - Prevention, Diagnosis and Therapy
Felix O. Kolb, MD and Ernest H. Rosenbaum, MD
There has been an explosion of interest in osteoporosis as a major world-wide public health problem.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/osteoporosis.html
First appeared 2002-08-12; updated 2007-11-07
RC931.K40.2 - Osteoporosis - Diagnosis and Consequences
Felix O. Kolb, MD and Ernest H. Rosenbaum, MD
Osteoporosis is defined as a skeletal disorder characterized by compromised bone strength (a thinning and weakening of the bon e) predisposing a person to an increased risk of fracture.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/osteodiagnosis.html
First appeared 2002-08-12; updated 2007-11-07
RC931.K40.3 - Osteoporosis - Evaluation, Prevention and Therapy
Felix O. Kolb, MD and Ernest H. Rosenbaum, MD
A great variety of options for the diagnosis and treatment have become available. The public has become informed about osteoporosis through the media, and osteoporosis has become a household word. Yet we are not certain about the best way to diagnose and to treat this multifactorial disorder
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/osteotherapy.html
First appeared 2002-08-12; updated 2007-11-07
RC931.K40.4 - Osteoporosis - How to Live Longer with Bones that are Stronger
Felix O. Kolb, MD and Ernest H. Rosenbaum, MD
Osteopenia and osteoporosis are common problems associated with age and cancer survivorship - leading to increased vertebral, hip and wrist and bone fractures. Breast and prostate cancer survivors may become osteoporotic with ovarian and androgen hormone deprivation therapy. Survivors need to follow a calcium rich diet with calcium supplements and vitamin D and seek guidance from their healthcare providers for possible drug treatment. Includes information about Osteoporosis and Bone Metastases, Endocrine Therapy, and Selective Aromatase Inhibitors.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/Survivor/osteoissue.html
First appeared 2008-01-20; updated 2008-08-02
RC931.K226.1 - Osteoporosis And Cancer Survivorship
Laurence Katznelson, MD, Felix O. Kolb, MD and Ernest H. Rosenbaum, MD
Prevention of osteoporosis is key. Interventions such as proper diet, exercise, lifestyle modifications and medications may help prevent bone loss and fractures. Proper diagnostic tests should be performed to determine bone strength.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/Survivorship/osteosurvive.html
First appeared 2009-09-01;

RC952 - Aging, Chronic disorders, and Older Adulthood Issues
Back to the Table of Contents


RC952.A5.L185.1 - Accidents
Jay Luxenberg, MD
Sensory and nervous system functions - hearing, vision, balance, reflexes and muscle strength are biologic changes of age. Hip fracture is associated with high loss of life. Avoid broken bones and twisted ankles, a serious fall or accidents with a safe home and workplace, well lit and accident proofed, and avoid excess alcohol to help you reach your goal of a healthy long life.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/accident.html
First appeared 2009-12-12;
RC952.A5.R39.1 - Aging and Chronic Illness Healthy Lifestyles
Ernest H. Rosenbaum, MD
Diet, nutrition, and weight are healthy supportive care. Balance exercise and physical activity increase endurance, strength, flexibility. Brain stimulation of memory, and reasoning may decrease risk of Alzheimers and dementia. Reduce diabetic risk. Higher insulin levels of type 2 diabetes promote senile brain plaques. Increased blood pressure leads to heart disease and mini strokes. Treating depression may also improve quality of life.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/age.html
First appeared 2007-08-12;


You are welcome to share this © article with friends, but do not forget to include the author name and web address. Permission needed to use articles on commercial and non commercial websites. Thank you.


Card Catalog Site Map  |  Site Index  |  Search CancerSupportiveCare.com  |  Contact Us  |  Books  |  Top
First appeared May 07, 2007; updated November 24, 2010